Microsoft will let Xbox, PC gamers play online with other platforms

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in Gaming | 0 comments

Microsoft will let Xbox, PC gamers play online with other platforms

Microsoft will let Xbox, PC gamers play online with other platforms by  Devindra Hardawar , @devindra It finally happened. Microsoft is officially opening up its network gaming capabilities, allowing developers to have Xbox One and Windows 10 games play online with other console and PC platforms. Yes, we could soon live in a world where Xbox One and PlayStation 4 players could fight each other to the death outside of comment sections (if Sony actually agrees to cooperate). It’s entirely up to developers to implement this cross-platform capability, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it ends up getting widely adopted. Psyonix’s Rocket League will be the first game to take advantage of the feature, starting with Xbox One/PC network play later this spring. “Cross-network play has been the number-one most requested feature our community has asked for since Rocket League was first announced on Xbox One, and now that we are able to pursue complete online unity on all platforms, today’s announcement is a dream come true,” Psyonix’s Jeremy Dunham said in a blog post today. Chris Charla, director of Microsoft’s Independent Developers for Xbox program, also noted that gamers will have the option to only play against other Xbox Live players, if they wish. And he also says the “invitation is open” for other networks to participate. All eyes will be on Sony to see how it responds at GDC this week.   taken from Here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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You will never finish playing ‘No Man’s Sky’. You will try. But it will never happen.

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

You will never finish playing ‘No Man’s Sky’. You will try. But it will never happen.

I’ll Never See All of No Man’s Sky‘s Beauty. Thank Goodness | WIRED In awe, I greet the sun from the mouth of a wind-swept cave. Tiny, crimson creatures streak about my fogged-up helmet, bathed in the cresting sunlight as a warning pops into view. “Radiation levels critical.”The grotto was my impromptu shelter in the face of a radiation storm. Trillions of miles from my home, I’d made a hasty landing on this unknown world to search for minerals to power my warp drive. But this world, like the dozens of others I’ve explored in my time with No Man’s Sky, doesn’t want me here. No Man’s Sky, out today on PlayStation 4 and Friday for PC, is about exploring the vast emptiness of space. With more than 18 quintillion worlds to visit, even if you took one second to explore each you’d need to spend tens of billions of lifetimes to see all of them. As I play, I probe the children of far-flung stars, and I do so knowing that I can never see all of it. I quickly learned to take solace in that. A contemporary videogame pushes for maximum completion, offering rewards, achievements or unlocks for crunching through 100 percent of its content. The PS4 even has a special award it grants to players who finish everything a game has to offer, a platinum trophy to add to their digital collection. Everything around you, the games and even the platform itself, pushes you to explore absolutely everything. This game isn’t just one I’ll never finish, it’s one that humanity will never finish. As a kid, I relished the chance to say I’d done everything I could in a game. I recall spending one summer playing through The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time again and again. Today, I never get that kind of time, and even if I do, I find the prospect of dutifully tracking and then completing every conceivable task to be stressful. No Man’s Sky‘s impossible scale offers me freedom from that cognitive strain.This game isn’t just one I’ll never finish, it’s one that humanity will never finish. Pondering the fact that it has billions of times more stars than we have in our own galaxy, you’d be forgiven for thinking that No Man’s Sky cannot possibly be as gargantuan as it sounds. But through the magic of math and algorithms, the game will create new planets, within physical and chemical-based constraints, as you explore. In a sense, you share the game world with whomever else is playing. As you discover new planets no one’s ever seen, you’ll have the opportunity to name them, as well as any creatures or landmasses on these planets, and upload your discoveries to a database that’s shared with every other player. But still: No Man’s Sky is so unfathomably large that you’re unlikely to come across a planet that someone else has named for quite a while. Just traveling from one system to another across the galaxy could involve several weeks of constant playtime. Sony So while players do indeed all share the same universe, these worlds are so vast and the distances between them so incredible that every experience will be unique. Not only is it impossible for me to see everything this game has to offer, but my time with it is ephemeral. No one will ever play and see exactly what I have, or been where I’ve been. If I crest a beautiful hill, land in the shallow waters of a green ocean, or find some rare lifeform and don’t document it, those...

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Play 900 classic arcade games in your web browser, right now

Posted by on Nov 2, 2014 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

Play 900 classic arcade games in your web browser, right now

Source  The Internet Arcade (Internet Archive) Via     Jason Scott Some 900 classic arcade games are now available for you to play, all you need is a web browser, and if you’re reading this, you’re probably good to go. They’re all housed for posterity over at The Internet Archive, thanks to the efforts of Jason Scott and those who worked JSMESS (or JavaScript Mess) a massive emulation project meant to port a multiplatform emulator into the JavaScript language. JSMESS has been successful at booting into a wide range of computers, and that left Scott wondering if arcade platforms could be supported. “I decided to futz around with our build environment (which, it must be absolutely stressed, the other JSMESS team members built, not me), just to ask the question, “And how hard would it be to build arcade games, anyway?” Scott writes. “It turned out to be easy. Very, very easy.” More video games than you could ever play The result is The Internet Arcade, which he announced this morning on his personal blog. The link is here, and it’s a solid bet something you remember from the halcyon days of birthday parties at minigolf or the local pizzeria is in here. That said, while many of the games were port-able, no guarantee is made that all are fully playable. Some had exotic controls or controllers, for example, that just don’t translate well to a keyboard layout. In other cases, vector graphics have trouble rendering, and still in others, the sound is glitched (like Jungle Hunt.) But many still are perfectly playable (BurgerTime, anyone?). They follow the standard MAME convention where 5 on your keyboard deposits the credit and 1 begins a 1-player game, with the arrow keys moving in those directions and the keys to the left or right of the space bar serving as action buttons. A lot will need figuring out, but that’s the gist of it. “Obviously, a lot of people are going to migrate to games they recognize and ones that they may not have played in years.,” Scott writes. “They’ll do a few rounds, probably get their asses kicked, smile, and go back to their news sites. A few more, I hope, will go towards games they’ve never heard of, with rules they have to suss out, and maybe more people will play some of these arcades in the coming months than the games ever saw in their “real” lifetimes. And my hope is that a handful, a probably tiny percentage, will begin plotting out ways to use this stuff in research, in writing, and remixing these old games into understanding their contexts. Time will tell. Taken from Here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Article: PlayStation 4 Laptop Mod: PlayBook 4

Posted by on Oct 19, 2014 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

Article: PlayStation 4 Laptop Mod: PlayBook 4

  Last month we saw Ed Zarick’s sweet Xbox One laptop mod. He reached out to us bearing good news for PlayStation fans – he’s now accepting orders for his PlayStation 4 laptop mod, which he’s calling the PlayBook 4. Thanks to the Destiny PS4 bundle – which has a white DualShock 4 controller to go with the white console – Ed has decided to offer black and white standard models.  The PlayBook 4 is designed much like the Xbook One mod. It uses the same Vizio 22″ 1080p LED monitor and has similar 3D printed corners as in the Xbox One laptop mod. The PS4 will also remain pristine throughout the modding process, but as with the Xbook One Ed can add an extra HDMI out port if you wish. You can also customize the vinyl graphics, the colors of the corners and even the color of the case if you don’t want black or white, as long as you’re willing to pay extra. The stock PlayBook 4 costs the same as the Xbook One: $1,095 (USD) if you send in your PS4 and $1,395 if you want Ed to get the console for you. You can place your order on Ed’s website. I wonder if Ed can make a Wii U laptop. He could call it a 3DS XXXL. Taken from here!     Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Watch 20 minutes of Metal Gear Solid 5: The Phantom Pain gameplay from Gamescom

Posted by on Aug 22, 2014 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

Watch 20 minutes of Metal Gear Solid 5: The Phantom Pain gameplay from Gamescom

By Michael McWhertor www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmvCI0x5r7k In the event that you missed Konami’s livestream of Metal Gear Solid 5: The Phantom Pain from Gamescom last week, now’s your chance to correct that. Konami uploaded all 20 minutes-plus of its The Phantom Pain walkthrough, showing off all manner of new gameplay features. The new capabilities of Snake’s cardboard box are explored in the video, as are some creative ways to use the Fulton surface-to-air recovery system. There’s even a tactical horse excrement deployment. For the uninitiated, there’s some helpful narration about what’s happening in the latest Metal Gear Solid. At Gamescom last week, series creator Hideo Kojima announced that Metal Gear Solid 5: The Phantom Pain and its prologue, Ground Zeroes, are coming to PC via Steam. The Phantom Pain is also bound for PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360 and Xbox One. Taken from here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Konami: Both Metal Gear Solid V episodes coming to PC via Steam

Posted by on Aug 14, 2014 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

Konami: Both Metal Gear Solid V episodes coming to PC via Steam

BY Kyle Orland   Famed Konami game creator Hideo Kojima seems determined to break news every single day of this week’s Gamescom expo. After yesterday’s revelation that Kojima is working on a new entry in the Silent Hill franchise, today comes news that Metal Gear Solid V will see release on the PC as well as consoles. The news leaked by way of an early post to the Konami website, and it was confirmed during a live gameplay presentation and interview with GameTrailers’ Geoff Keighley, which is ongoing. The website blurb suggests that both the introductory Ground Zeroes and the more substantial Phantom Pain episodes will be coming to Windows via Steam. Metal Gear Solid V is the first game to run on Konami’s new Fox Engine, and we can’t wait to see what the PC modding community does with the landscape of Kojima’s futuristic Afghanistan. In a March interview, Kojima told Gamespot that he was interested in jumping back into PC development. “PC, that’s my original background. I originally created PC games,” Kojima said at the time. “A long time ago I didn’t want to rely on platforms to release games, so if people want it, I cannot make a formal announcement, but that is definitely something that I would like to do.” The original Metal Gear Solid saw a PC release in late 2000, years after it premiered on the original PlayStation in 1998, and Metal Gear Solid 2 saw a Substance port for the PC in 2003. Metal Gear Solid games have traditionally premiered on Sony systems until the release of Ground Zeroes on the Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, and PS4 in March. Taken from here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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