Understanding Your Suspension Sag

Posted by on Aug 4, 2016 in KTM THINGS, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Understanding Your Suspension Sag

By Scot Gustafson   The most important thing you can to do to improve the handling of your bike is to set your sag. When you sit on your motorcycle your bike ‘sags’ or compresses under your weight. The amount of sag affects handling by changing the ride height of your motorcycle fore and aft. Understanding how sag works lets you fine tune your bike so it will perform it’s best. To determine rider sag put your bike on a stand with the wheels off the ground and measure the distance from the rear axle to a fixed point near the rear fender/side panel. The fixed point should be along the arc that the axle travels when the shock is compressed. Stand on the footpegs as it gives a more consistent measurement than sitting on the seat. Bounce lightly on the bike to overcome stiction and measure the compressed distance. The difference between the two is the rider sag. The correct amount is approximately 33% of the bikes total available travel, usually between 95-115mm on full size bikes. The correct amount varies because of bike geometry, rider preference, and type of riding. The rider sag should be set with the rider in full gear. The bike should have correct levels of fluids, be free of excess mud, and the shock should be cool to the touch as heat build up changes sag levels. Once you have determined your rider sag it is a good idea to check your free sag. The free sag is the amount the bike compresses under its own weight. The free sag determines if you have the correct spring rate for your weight. On full size bikes this can range from 25-45mm. If you are towards the extremes of this range you should consider a different shock spring. If you have around 25mm or less free sag your spring has too much preload on it to get the proper rider sag and your spring rate is too soft. If you have around or more than 45mm you don’t have enough preload on your spring and should consider a softer spring. On most bikes you change the sag of your bike with a hammer and punch. After loosening the shock springs lockring you can turn the spring preload ring to increase or decrease sag. Usually 1 complete turn changes the sag by about 3mm. If your shock is hot from riding it is best to note sag changes by the amount of turns in or out since the rider sag was set. For example, rider sag at the beginning of the day is 102mm and the best setting is 1 turn softer than that. It is to your benefit to test different sag settings for various conditions as it has a huge cause and effect. Decreasing the sag of your bike generally makes it quicker handling but reduces high speed stability. Decrease sag on tight courses to improve steering accuracy and in muddy conditions to handle weight build up. Increasing the sag of your bike usually makes it more stable but decreases front end traction and cornering ability. Increase your sag on high speed and sandy tracks to improve stability. Too much sag will cause your front end to be too light and deflect off bumps and too little sag will cause your shock to be too stiff on bumps. A soft spring will initially ride high in the rear because it needs to be preloaded more than a stiffer spring. Conversely, a stiff spring will have a lower initial ride height but will feel more...

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BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass

Posted by on Jan 28, 2016 in HeadLines, Motorcycles, Technology | 0 comments

BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass

BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass The concept could be reality in a couple years By Jacob Kastrenakes Nearly four years ago, Google published a video previewing what it might be like to use an augmented reality headset. It showed all kinds of useful information hanging out in the corner of your vision, and then that same information lowering into your view as you needed to know critical details, like how to get from one place to another. That fascinating concept never made it to life — all we got was Google Glass. But now BMW is taking some of that video’s best ideas and turning them into a much more useful product. It’s making a motorcycle helmet with a Glass-like heads-up-display, allowing information like speed limits, directions, and incoming phone calls to be displayed in your field of view. BMW is calling this helmet a concept for now, but it had a wearable demo on display at CES. The helmet has an exceptionally snug fit — I’m told this is normal for motorcycle helmets — and it took me a minute to get the eyepiece in a place where I could read it. Once it was on, BMW put me on a stationary motorcycle, complete with rumbling, noise, and fans to throw wind in your face. It then started the bike off on a virtual drive, with a screen in front of me displaying an empty road that winds past fields of grass and along the side of a cliff. It’s immediately clear why this tech is useful As soon as the ride started, a glowing green box appeared in the center of my vision, with the bike’s increasing speed displayed on the left and its current gear displayed smaller on the right. Note that, unlike in BMW’s promotional imagery, the demo I saw only included one color: green. The bigger problem for me was that the text was sitting right on top of the road. After adjusting the helmet a bit, I was able to get it to a comfortable spot off to the right, where I could see my speed without it getting in the way. I’m not sure where the display is supposed to sit; BMW shows it at the bottom, but I can’t even imagine how it would get down there. Still, even at this prototype stage, it was immediately clear how BMW’s helmet can improve upon some of the key promises of Glass. For one, this is a motorcycle helmet — not something you’re going to be wearing all day — so the eyepiece can be much bigger, making it easier to read. There’s also an obvious and very helpful use case: motorcycle riders won’t have to look down to see their speed; it also offers pertinent information — road safety updates, maps, and so on — that they otherwise wouldn’t have a way to check. BMW hopes to bring its helmet from concept to a retail product within a few years. It likely still has a lot to do. While the display, which comes from an augmented-reality eyepiece company called DigiLens, already works fairly well, much of the helmet’s intelligence — its ability to connect to the bike and your phone — appears to be incomplete, explaining why BMW was showing a scripted, non-interactive demo. If BMW can get it all working, this helmet could be one of the first augmented reality headsets worth wearing. Taken from here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click...

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2015 MotoGP Entry List Features 25 Riders & 15 Teams

Posted by on Oct 23, 2014 in HeadLines, Motorcycles | 0 comments

2015 MotoGP Entry List Features 25 Riders & 15 Teams

The FIM has released the provisional rider-entry list for the 2015 MotoGP Championship, which features 25 riders and 15 teams. The provisional list below includes 23 riders, with two to be confirmed There are 15 teams in 2015 MotoGP, which features 18 rounds. The teams are split between Factory Option, Satellite with Factory Backing, and Open. The Factory Teams include: Ducati Team Repsol Honda Movistar Yamaha MotoGP Factory Aprilia Gresini Team Suzuki MotoGP The Satellite Teams with Factory Backing include: Pramac Racing (Ducati) CWM LCR Honda Monster Yamaha Tech 3 Marc VDS Racing Team Movistar Yamaha MotoGP Marc VDS Racing The Open Teams Include: NGM Forward Racing (Yamaha) Drive M7 Aspar Cardion AB Motoracing Avintia Racing Except for Movistar Yamaha MotoGP and Repsol Honda, the grid will look completely different for 2015. Following is the provisional rider list: # Rider Nat. Team Machine 4 A. DOVIZIOSO ITA DUCATI TEAM DUCATI* 6 S. BRADL GER NGM FORWARD RACING FORWARD YAMAHA 8 H. BARBERA SPA AVINTIA RACING DUCATI 9 D. PETRUCCI ITA PRAMAC RACING DUCATI* 17 K. ABRAHAM CZE CARDION AB MOTORACING HONDA 19 A. BAUTISTA SPA FACTORY APRILIA GRESINI APRILIA* 25 M. VINALES SPA TEAM SUZUKI MotoGP SUZUKI* 26 D. PEDROSA SPA REPSOL HONDA TEAM HONDA* 29 A. IANNONE ITA DUCATI TEAM DUCATI* 35 C. CRUTCHLOW GBR CWM LCR HONDA HONDA* 38 B. SMITH GBR MONSTER YAMAHA TECH 3 YAMAHA* 41 A. ESPARGARO SPA TEAM SUZUKI MotoGP SUZUKI* 43 J. MILLER AUS CWM LCR HONDA HONDA 44 P. ESPARGARO SPA MONSTER YAMAHA TECH 3 YAMAHA* 45 S. REDDING GBR MARC VDS RACING TEAM HONDA* 46 V. ROSSI ITA MOVISTAR YAMAHA MotoGP YAMAHA* 50 E. LAVERTY IRL DRIVE M7 ASPAR HONDA 63 M. DI MEGLIO FRA AVINTIA RACING DUCATI 68 Y. HERNANDEZ COL PRAMAC RACING DUCATI* 69 N. HAYDEN USA DRIVE M7 ASPAR HONDA 76 L. BAZ FRA NGM FORWARD RACING FORWARD YAMAHA 93 M. MARQUEZ SPA REPSOL HONDA TEAM HONDA* 99 J. LORENZO SPA MOVISTAR YAMAHA MotoGP YAMAHA* TO BE CONFIRMED FACTORY APRILIA GRESINI APRILIA TO BE CONFIRMED OCTO IODARACING TEAM TBC Taken from here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Picture: 2015 BMW S1000RR | FIRST LOOK

Posted by on Oct 2, 2014 in HeadLines, Motorcycles | 0 comments

Picture: 2015 BMW S1000RR | FIRST LOOK

Intermot: BMW announces more power and updates for the next S1000RR. By Motorcyclist posted Oct 2nd, 2014 at 12:58am <img typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/modules/bonnier/post_social/theme/post_icon_24.png” /> <img class=”float-right” typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/files/styles/medium_1x_/public/images/2014/10/s1000rr_web2.jpg?itok=pizujBGv” /> BMW’s take-no-prisoners literbike debuts for 2015 with some serious numbers to brag on––a 6-horsepower increase for a claimed total of 199 with a peak torque of 83 pound-feet, and an advertised weight of 450 pounds with a full tank of gas and Race ABS. The engine has a re-engineered cylinder head, a new intake cam, and lighter intake valves. An airbox with a different capacity works with shorter intake lengths for better fuel atomization and more power. There’s also a new exhaust system, which does away with the front silencer for a total weight savings of almost seven pounds. <img class=”float-left” typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/files/styles/medium_1x_/public/images/2014/10/s1000rr_web5.jpg?itok=e2TOZVwQ” /> Not all of the newness comes from the engine bay. A new, lighter frame houses the RR’s powerplant and offers an optimized blend of rigidity and flexibility. Revised chassis geometry promises better handling, traction, and feedback at the limit. An electronically controlled Dynamic Damping Control system, as used on the HP4, is optional on the RR. <img class=”float-right” typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/files/styles/medium_1x_/public/images/2014/10/s1000rr_web6.jpg?itok=uj-sk7Q3″ /> You can’t build a top-class sportbike these days without riding modes, and the S1000RR comes with a handful. There are three standard modes––Rain, Sport, and Race––and if you push the optional Pro riding mode button (and who wouldn’t?) you get two additional modes: Slick and User, which can be configured by the rider. The Pro option also includes Launch Control and a pit-lane speed limiter, along with the stutter-bark sound familiar to motorcycle racing fans. For the full racing experience order the optional HP Gear Shift Assist Pro. <img class=”full-width” typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/files/styles/medium_1x_/public/images/2014/10/s1000rr_web4.jpg?itok=oKlRbpv9″ /> Race ABS and Automatic Stability Control are standard. And in a first for superbikes, the S1000RR comes with optional electronic cruise control (no word yet on the upper speed limit). Available colors include Racing Red/Light White, Black Storm metallic, and BMW Motorsport. Stay tuned for the MSRP. <img class=”full-width” typeof=”foaf:Image” alt=”” src=”http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/sites/motorcyclistonline.com/files/styles/medium_1x_/public/images/2014/10/s1000rr_web3.jpg?itok=qcRDizO5″ /><span id=”mce_marker” data-mce-type=”bookmark”>​</span> Taken from Here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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New BMW S1000RR: First official details

Posted by on Sep 18, 2014 in HeadLines, Motorcycles | 0 comments

New BMW S1000RR: First official details

  Visordown News The current S1000RR BMW HAS just revealed the first details of updates to the S1000RR for 2015. Changes to the firm’s flagship sports bike include engine tweaks and new suspension geometry for improved handling. As well as giving it a performance boost – expected to be an extra five or six horses, taking it to about 200hp – BMW says it has improved user-friendliness in conditions such as ‘taking bends dynamically on country roads or proactive racing on the track’. It’s likely the firm is referring here to electronics upgrades including the addition of cornering ABS, designed to prevent the tyres from washing out under braking even when banked over in a turn. KTM introduced the Bosch-developed system on the 1190 Adventure this year. It also stops the tendency of the bike to stand up and go straight on under braking in a corner. Visordown recently revealed the system was to be made available as a retro-fit option on the highest spec version of the S1000RR, the HP4. With the HP4 discontinued from next year, the updated base edition is likely to have gained all its electronics, as an option if not standard. BMW said in a release today: ‘The BMW supersports bike goes into its next generation with an optimised engine for enhanced performance and ridability. Meanwhile a new suspension geometry provides increased riding precision and even better handling. In addition to increasing performance, the focus here was particularly on making the new S 1000 RR more user-friendly. Whether in everyday use, taking bends dynamically on country roads or proactive racing on the track – the new S 1000 RR is always uncompromising.’ BMW confirmed earlier this week that the updated S1000RR would be among three new models to be unveiled at the Intermot Cologne motorcycle show on September 3, with a further two to be debuted at the Eicma Milan show on November 5. No details of the new S1000RR have been released until now. The other new models are likely to include the S1000-based adventure-tourer, thought to be called the S1000XR, which Visordown revealed in spy shots in August and March. There’s also a liquid-cooled K1600 bagger, now known to be called the K1600 GTL, which we also revealed in spy shots. Taken From Here! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Road test How I crashed a KTM 1290 Super Duke R

Posted by on Aug 14, 2014 in HeadLines, Motorcycles | 0 comments

Road test How I crashed a KTM 1290 Super Duke R

By Luke Bowler Bumped into BaronVonGrumble on his Super Duke R test bike! I OFTEN listen to riders go about describing the traits of a good motorcycle engine; ‘It has power everywhere’ they say. However, I’ve come to the realisation that what they’re really trying to say is: there isn’t a LACK of power anywhere. But perhaps that’s because I recently spent several days in France riding an unfaired missile and it redefined what having power everywhere really means. Naked bikes have been around for ages, so have V-twin engines, and a production motorcycle that makes 180hp is no longer particularly impressive. However, tie those all together and you have something a little bit mad, a little bit different, and quite a bit special. In fact, what you have is a KTM 1290 Super Duke R. Some people will say what’s the point? It’s too much power; you’ll never use it all and the bike is far better than you’ll ever be. Ever slept with a pornstar? No, me neither. I probably wouldn’t do the job much justice but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t still have fun. Riding it is still massively enjoyable and unique. I’m talking about the KTM again, by the way. Let’s talk wheelies too. A bike’s ability to do one is by no means important and has little to no bearing on the outcome of a bike review (this is a lie). But if one useful thing can be said for them, other than being potentially the most fun thing you can do on a motorcycle, if not in the world (this is not a lie), it’s their ability to expose power, or lack of it. Fortunately for KTM, that 1,301cc V-twin has it covered. Want to lift the front end at over 100mph on an inline-four litrebike? You’ll bounce off the limiter in second gear and a stock thousand doesn’t have enough torque to lift the front in fourth, even if an internet forum super-poster says it will. So you’ll want third gear, a large crest, the engine wound up, and a handful of throttle and slipped clutch. That’s a lot of prerequisites just to show-off. Want to do the same on the Super Duke R? Choose third or fourth gear, slip the clutch slightly and give the bike some throttle. And that’s it. It doesn’t matter if the engine is just above idle or sat near its 10,500rpm redline, the front will come up. It’s as easy as paint-by-numbers, just more dangerous. And yet in spite of its hooligan capabilities, it’s one of the most well-mannered bikes that I’ve ever ridden. There’s no lumpiness to the engine and the fuelling is nigh on perfect. I was expecting disobedience and unwieldiness but instead got a tractable all-rounder that just happens to be extremely fast. It’s comfortable too. There’s no neck-straining windblast below 100mph and the 18L tank sees 150 miles between fill-ups. Surprisingly, it all makes a strong case for the touring-spec version. An 180hp naked touring bike suddenly doesn’t seem so silly after all… There are loads of things the KTM does right, but it has its weaknesses too. With such fierce acceleration and torque on offer the front wheel spends much of its time skimming across the asphalt. With that in mind you want a bike that’s sure-footed and stable when making good progress – traits that could be improved upon on the Super Duke R. Up the pace like this over a dodgy surface and the bike can start shaking its head. The non-adjustable WP steering damper does relatively little to...

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