Article: 15 Best Bitcoin Exchange Reviews (and Guides) 2017

Posted by on May 30, 2017 in Bitcoin, HeadLines | 0 comments

Article: 15 Best Bitcoin Exchange Reviews (and Guides) 2017

15 Best Bitcoin Exchange Reviews (and Guides) 2017 http://flip.it/DX6w2T Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Smart phone Battery Myths & Facts

Posted by on May 20, 2017 in HeadLines, Technology | 0 comments

Smart phone Battery Myths & Facts

Do We Really Know Better About the Battery Life? See Here!! Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Article: Malware infects computers by hiding in browser ad GIFs

Posted by on Dec 9, 2016 in NET ADMIN | 0 comments

Article: Malware infects computers by hiding in browser ad GIFs

Malware infects computers by hiding in browser ad GIFs http://flip.it/awphb4 Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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New free eBooks for SysAdmins and DevOps

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in NET ADMIN | 0 comments

New free eBooks for SysAdmins and DevOps

New free eBooks for SysAdmins and DevOps – VMware NSX, Windows 10, SQL Server 2016 https://4sysops.com/archives/new-free-ebooks-for-sysadmins-and-devops-vmware-nsx-windows-10-sql-server-2016/ Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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You will never finish playing ‘No Man’s Sky’. You will try. But it will never happen.

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in Gaming, HeadLines | 0 comments

You will never finish playing ‘No Man’s Sky’. You will try. But it will never happen.

I’ll Never See All of No Man’s Sky‘s Beauty. Thank Goodness | WIRED In awe, I greet the sun from the mouth of a wind-swept cave. Tiny, crimson creatures streak about my fogged-up helmet, bathed in the cresting sunlight as a warning pops into view. “Radiation levels critical.”The grotto was my impromptu shelter in the face of a radiation storm. Trillions of miles from my home, I’d made a hasty landing on this unknown world to search for minerals to power my warp drive. But this world, like the dozens of others I’ve explored in my time with No Man’s Sky, doesn’t want me here. No Man’s Sky, out today on PlayStation 4 and Friday for PC, is about exploring the vast emptiness of space. With more than 18 quintillion worlds to visit, even if you took one second to explore each you’d need to spend tens of billions of lifetimes to see all of them. As I play, I probe the children of far-flung stars, and I do so knowing that I can never see all of it. I quickly learned to take solace in that. A contemporary videogame pushes for maximum completion, offering rewards, achievements or unlocks for crunching through 100 percent of its content. The PS4 even has a special award it grants to players who finish everything a game has to offer, a platinum trophy to add to their digital collection. Everything around you, the games and even the platform itself, pushes you to explore absolutely everything. This game isn’t just one I’ll never finish, it’s one that humanity will never finish. As a kid, I relished the chance to say I’d done everything I could in a game. I recall spending one summer playing through The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time again and again. Today, I never get that kind of time, and even if I do, I find the prospect of dutifully tracking and then completing every conceivable task to be stressful. No Man’s Sky‘s impossible scale offers me freedom from that cognitive strain.This game isn’t just one I’ll never finish, it’s one that humanity will never finish. Pondering the fact that it has billions of times more stars than we have in our own galaxy, you’d be forgiven for thinking that No Man’s Sky cannot possibly be as gargantuan as it sounds. But through the magic of math and algorithms, the game will create new planets, within physical and chemical-based constraints, as you explore. In a sense, you share the game world with whomever else is playing. As you discover new planets no one’s ever seen, you’ll have the opportunity to name them, as well as any creatures or landmasses on these planets, and upload your discoveries to a database that’s shared with every other player. But still: No Man’s Sky is so unfathomably large that you’re unlikely to come across a planet that someone else has named for quite a while. Just traveling from one system to another across the galaxy could involve several weeks of constant playtime. Sony So while players do indeed all share the same universe, these worlds are so vast and the distances between them so incredible that every experience will be unique. Not only is it impossible for me to see everything this game has...

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Hiring the Perfect IT Employee

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016 in HeadLines, Technology | 0 comments

Hiring the Perfect IT Employee

Hiring the Perfect IT Employee by Joseph Moody Nothing can screw up a team faster than hiring a bad employee. The focus is often on certifications, degrees, and experience (CDEs). Softer traits like honesty and adaptation are often ignored. For the most part, it is easier to look at hard stats than to measure these soft qualities. Below are five specific traits you should look for along with the steps you can take to gauge these attributes. Focusing on these and the CDEs will help you hire the perfect IT employee.   Honesty Of the five traits, honesty is the most important. Why? Well, an honest admin is willing to admit a mistake and learn from it. They have no problem not knowing something and can admit that.  A dishonest admin will pass blame or cover up mistakes. Separating these two in an interview involves a bit of game theory. I prefer choosing from one of these two methods. Method 1: Stump the Chump This isn’t the most accurate of titles as you don’t actually want to make the applicant look bad. In a nutshell, start with a somewhat basic question for a specific subject that the interviewee should know. Keep moving the difficulty of the question up until you exhaust their level of knowledge. Repeat the process with another subject related to the job. You will pretty quickly see if the person will try to BS or if they are fine admitting something they don’t know. As a side benefit, you can accurately gauge their technical qualifications as well. Method 2: Worst Mistake In IT, we have this huge fear when talking about a mess up that we’ve caused. Hearing someone talk about a big technical mistake they’ve made and what they’ve learned provides a lot of insight into their character. Ask about past mistakes and any lessons learned from the mistake.   Preventive If you are a regular reader, I would bet that you are a huge believer in the magician style of work. If you want to move away from firefighting (or keep those fires from even starting), hiring other magicians is a sure way to do so. Look for examples of a preventive nature in their resume. Ask questions about big projects. You can often see trends of preventive and reactive natures this way. Ask questions about past problems at work and solutions that they have come up with. See if this mindset exists outside of IT. Preventiveness tends to run with the person as a whole. One favorite questions is actually three parts. Would you describe yourself as primarily reactive or proactive? (note – everyone says proactive) Can you give an example of a problem you proactively fixed? (most can). Can you give an example of a problem you have reactively fixed? It is this last one that is so difficult to answer. Though not always true, a proactive person stays bothered by a reactive solution.   People oriented Not to argue too much with Al Capone but you actually can get really far with just a kind word. An IT professional who is people oriented understands who they are serving (ex: the students and teachers in a school). People Oriented IT professionals don’t belittle end users for not knowing something. They go out of their way to improve the technical experience and to integrate IT into the organization as a whole. It is...

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All remaining legacy wallets will be upgraded to the newest version of the Blockchain Wallet on Aug 16 

Posted by on Aug 14, 2016 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

All remaining legacy wallets will be upgraded to the newest version of the Blockchain Wallet on Aug 16 

Check out @blockchain’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/blockchain/status/764177189722058752?s=09 https://t.co/DR6BYim0ph Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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Understanding Your Suspension Sag

Posted by on Aug 4, 2016 in KTM THINGS, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Understanding Your Suspension Sag

By Scot Gustafson   The most important thing you can to do to improve the handling of your bike is to set your sag. When you sit on your motorcycle your bike ‘sags’ or compresses under your weight. The amount of sag affects handling by changing the ride height of your motorcycle fore and aft. Understanding how sag works lets you fine tune your bike so it will perform it’s best. To determine rider sag put your bike on a stand with the wheels off the ground and measure the distance from the rear axle to a fixed point near the rear fender/side panel. The fixed point should be along the arc that the axle travels when the shock is compressed. Stand on the footpegs as it gives a more consistent measurement than sitting on the seat. Bounce lightly on the bike to overcome stiction and measure the compressed distance. The difference between the two is the rider sag. The correct amount is approximately 33% of the bikes total available travel, usually between 95-115mm on full size bikes. The correct amount varies because of bike geometry, rider preference, and type of riding. The rider sag should be set with the rider in full gear. The bike should have correct levels of fluids, be free of excess mud, and the shock should be cool to the touch as heat build up changes sag levels. Once you have determined your rider sag it is a good idea to check your free sag. The free sag is the amount the bike compresses under its own weight. The free sag determines if you have the correct spring rate for your weight. On full size bikes this can range from 25-45mm. If you are towards the extremes of this range you should consider a different shock spring. If you have around 25mm or less free sag your spring has too much preload on it to get the proper rider sag and your spring rate is too soft. If you have around or more than 45mm you don’t have enough preload on your spring and should consider a softer spring. On most bikes you change the sag of your bike with a hammer and punch. After loosening the shock springs lockring you can turn the spring preload ring to increase or decrease sag. Usually 1 complete turn changes the sag by about 3mm. If your shock is hot from riding it is best to note sag changes by the amount of turns in or out since the rider sag was set. For example, rider sag at the beginning of the day is 102mm and the best setting is 1 turn softer than that. It is to your benefit to test different sag settings for various conditions as it has a huge cause and effect. Decreasing the sag of your bike generally makes it quicker handling but reduces high speed stability. Decrease sag on tight courses to improve steering accuracy and in muddy conditions to handle weight build up. Increasing the sag of your bike usually makes it more stable but decreases front end traction and cornering ability. Increase your sag on high speed and sandy tracks to improve stability. Too much sag will cause your front end to be too light and deflect off bumps...

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Linux free book

Posted by on Jun 7, 2016 in NET ADMIN, Technology | 0 comments

Linux free  book

Linux All-in-One For Dummies (a $25.99 value) FREE! http://www.ubuntugeek.com/linux-all-in-one-for-dummies-a-25-99-value-free.html Share this:ShareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new...

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BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass

Posted by on Jan 28, 2016 in HeadLines, Motorcycles, Technology | 0 comments

BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass

BMW made a motorcycle helmet that builds in the best parts of Google Glass The concept could be reality in a couple years By Jacob Kastrenakes Nearly four years ago, Google published a video previewing what it might be like to use an augmented reality headset. It showed all kinds of useful information hanging out in the corner of your vision, and then that same information lowering into your view as you needed to know critical details, like how to get from one place to another. That fascinating concept never made it to life — all we got was Google Glass. But now BMW is taking some of that video’s best ideas and turning them into a much more useful product. It’s making a motorcycle helmet with a Glass-like heads-up-display, allowing information like speed limits, directions, and incoming phone calls to be displayed in your field of view. BMW is calling this helmet a concept for now, but it had a wearable demo on display at CES. The helmet has an exceptionally snug fit — I’m told this is normal for motorcycle helmets — and it took me a minute to get the eyepiece in a place where I could read it. Once it was on, BMW put me on a stationary motorcycle, complete with rumbling, noise, and fans to throw wind in your face. It then started the bike off on a virtual drive, with a screen in front of me displaying an empty road that winds past fields of grass and along the side of a cliff. It’s immediately clear why this tech is useful As soon as the ride started, a glowing green box appeared in the center of my vision, with the bike’s increasing speed displayed on the left and its current gear displayed smaller on the right. Note that, unlike in BMW’s promotional imagery, the demo I saw only included one color: green. The bigger problem for me was that the text was sitting right on top of the road. After adjusting the helmet a bit, I was able to get it to a comfortable spot off to the right, where I could see my speed without it getting in the way. I’m not sure where the display is supposed to sit; BMW shows it at the bottom, but I can’t even imagine how it would get down there. Still, even at this prototype stage, it was immediately clear how BMW’s helmet can improve upon some of the key promises of Glass. For one, this is a motorcycle helmet — not something you’re going to be wearing all day — so the eyepiece can be much bigger, making it easier to read. There’s also an obvious and very helpful use case: motorcycle riders won’t have to look down to see their speed; it also offers pertinent information — road safety updates, maps, and so on — that they otherwise wouldn’t have a way to check. BMW hopes to bring its helmet from concept to a retail product within a few years. It likely still has a lot to do. While the display, which comes from an augmented-reality eyepiece company called DigiLens, already works fairly well, much of the helmet’s intelligence — its ability to connect to the bike and your phone — appears to be incomplete, explaining why BMW was showing a scripted, non-interactive...

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